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Xiaomi Piano & Piano Smart Lamp Presented

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Xiaomi has introduced a smart lamp Mijia Smart Piano Lamp, designed for installation on pianos and pianos.

Xiaomi Mijia Smart Piano Lamp uses high quality low blue light LED sources. It meets the requirements of the Illumination Uniformity Index standard for table lamps for reading and writing. The light from the lamp can cover all 88 keys.

Xiaomi Piano & Piano Smart Lamp Presented

The design is made in such a way as to prevent direct light from entering the human eye. The lamp also has a radar detection function, which allows the light to turn on and off automatically when a person sits down and stands up from behind the tool.

Using the Mijia app, the lamp can also record piano playing time, helping parents remotely understand how much time their children actually spend playing.

Xiaomi Mijia Smart Piano Lamp will go on sale in China on March 21 this year for $100.

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Dream Chaser is preparing for the first demonstration flight to the ISS

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Dream Chaser is preparing for the first demonstration flight to

The Dream Chaser spaceplane, developed by Sierra Space, is being tested at a specialized NASA stand and is preparing for its first demonstration flight to the ISS.

Dream Chaser is preparing for the first demonstration flight to the ISS

Dream Chaser and its Shooting Star cargo module at NASA’s test site. Neil Armstrong. Source: Sierra Space/Shay Saldana

At the moment, tests are underway of both the space plane itself and its cargo module in order to prepare for the extreme conditions of outer space. As part of these tests, which are conducted at the Armstrong Test Center, one of the key facilities of the NASA Research Center, Dream Chaser is thoroughly tested to withstand the harsh conditions that await it during launch and flight.

“We have some of the most powerful and efficient systems in the world for simulating and testing the extreme conditions that a spacecraft will encounter,” said the director of the research center. Glenna, Dr. Jimmy Kenyon.

One of the main tasks of these tests was a vibration test of the Dream Chaser and its cargo module, which were subjected to a powerful shaking system simulating launch and reentry conditions. Studying the spacecraft’s vibrations, similar to those it will encounter at launch, promises to improve mission reliability and safety.

After successful completion of vibration tests, Dream Chaser will travel to an underground vacuum chamber that will simulate the conditions of the space environment. As part of these tests, Dream Chaser will be subjected to low pressure, low temperatures and dynamic heating.

These tests are an important step in preparing Dream Chaser for its first unmanned demonstration launch to the ISS. As part of NASA’s commercial resupply program, the aircraft will deliver more than 3,500 kilograms of cargo to the ISS this year.

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Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

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Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar

Astronomers from Paul Sabatier University in France investigated the possible influence of nearby stars in the Milky Way on the solar system. They used the SIMBAD database, which contains information on stellar parallaxes and proper motions from the Gaia satellite, to search for so-called “Nemesis” stars – hypothetical companions of the Sun.

Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

Source: NASA/ESA/STScI.

The researchers turned their attention to stars that pass through the outer Oort Cloud, a region of the outer solar system that contains populations of icy cometary bodies. As a result of such close flybys, gravitational interactions between the star and comets can change the orbits of the outer planets and send comets into the solar system.

The Oort Cloud is a heterogeneous region with many icy cometary bodies, extending up to 3.2 light-years from the Sun. Inside the Oort Cloud lies the Kuiper Belt, which also contains comets and small bodies such as Pluto. There is also a region called the Hill Cloud located between the Oort Cloud and the Kuiper Belt. It is these regions that are the main sources of comets with long orbits.

Astronomers have been looking for stars that periodically come too close to the Solar System, pushing comets out of the Oort Cloud into the inner Solar System. Such close flybys occur approximately every hundred thousand years, with rarer events occurring every few million years when the star comes within about 52,000 astronomical units of the Sun. These events cause gravitational disturbances that lead to the ejection of cometary nuclei from their orbits and their subsequent movement into the depths of the outer solar system.

The researchers compiled a list of potential candidate stars based on data from the SIMBAD database. They also continue to study other stars that may periodically come too close to the solar system and affect the Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt. Establishing the precise orbits and movements of these stars will allow for a deeper understanding of the evolution and structure of the Solar System.

One possible “nemesis” was Scholz’s star, a red dwarf that is believed to have “grazed” the edge of the Oort Cloud about 70,000 years ago along with a brown dwarf companion. It is currently approximately 22 light-years from the Sun and has likely spawned a swarm of comets that will take over a million years to reach the inner Solar System. This approach could also affect the orbits of Kuiper Belt objects. Another star highlighted in this study is the G-type star HD 7977. It is located about 247 light-years from Earth and had a possible close encounter about 2.8 million years ago.

The Asirons are interested not only in events of the past, but also in future convergences. One likely approach is with the star Gliese 710. It is expected to fly past the Sun in about 1.29 million years at a distance of about 10,520 astronomical units. There is a high probability that it will pass through the Oort Cloud, which could lead to a shift in the flow of comets towards the Sun. Some researchers predict that this could result in about 10 naked-eye comets per year.

This study offers new insights into the influence of Milky Way stars on the solar system. Understanding these processes opens up new opportunities for studying the history and development of the Solar System, and also makes it possible to predict the future movement of cometary bodies.

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Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

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1708834752 571 Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar

Astronomers from Paul Sabatier University in France investigated the possible influence of nearby stars in the Milky Way on the solar system. They used the SIMBAD database, which contains information on stellar parallaxes and proper motions from the Gaia satellite, to search for so-called “Nemesis” stars – hypothetical companions of the Sun.

Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

Source: NASA/ESA/STScI.

The researchers turned their attention to stars that pass through the outer Oort Cloud, a region of the outer solar system that contains populations of icy cometary bodies. As a result of such close flybys, gravitational interactions between the star and comets can change the orbits of the outer planets and send comets into the solar system.

The Oort Cloud is a heterogeneous region with many icy cometary bodies, extending up to 3.2 light-years from the Sun. Inside the Oort Cloud lies the Kuiper Belt, which also contains comets and small bodies such as Pluto. There is also a region called the Hill Cloud located between the Oort Cloud and the Kuiper Belt. It is these regions that are the main sources of comets with long orbits.

Astronomers have been looking for stars that periodically come too close to the Solar System, pushing comets out of the Oort Cloud into the inner Solar System. Such close flybys occur approximately every hundred thousand years, with rarer events occurring every few million years when the star comes within about 52,000 astronomical units of the Sun. These events cause gravitational disturbances that lead to the ejection of cometary nuclei from their orbits and their subsequent movement into the depths of the outer solar system.

The researchers compiled a list of potential candidate stars based on data from the SIMBAD database. They also continue to study other stars that may periodically come too close to the solar system and affect the Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt. Establishing the precise orbits and movements of these stars will allow for a deeper understanding of the evolution and structure of the Solar System.

One possible “nemesis” was Scholz’s star, a red dwarf that is believed to have “grazed” the edge of the Oort Cloud about 70,000 years ago along with a brown dwarf companion. It is currently approximately 22 light-years from the Sun and has likely spawned a swarm of comets that will take over a million years to reach the inner Solar System. This approach could also affect the orbits of Kuiper Belt objects. Another star highlighted in this study is the G-type star HD 7977. It is located about 247 light-years from Earth and had a possible close encounter about 2.8 million years ago.

The Asirons are interested not only in events of the past, but also in future convergences. One likely approach is with the star Gliese 710. It is expected to fly past the Sun in about 1.29 million years at a distance of about 10,520 astronomical units. There is a high probability that it will pass through the Oort Cloud, which could lead to a shift in the flow of comets towards the Sun. Some researchers predict that this could result in about 10 naked-eye comets per year.

This study offers new insights into the influence of Milky Way stars on the solar system. Understanding these processes opens up new opportunities for studying the history and development of the Solar System, and also makes it possible to predict the future movement of cometary bodies.

Continue Reading

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