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Wi Fi network can be used to count the number of Wi Fi network can be used to count the number of

Security

Wi-Fi network can be used to count the number of people in a room

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The method will allow tracking the number of visitors in establishments to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, led by Yasamin Mostofi, have found a way to use regular Wi-Fi network as a tool for counting the number of people in a given space.

Tools like this already exist and allow places like airports and shopping malls to track visitors and the flow of people through buildings. But they rely either on specialized equipment such as video cameras and sophisticated image recognition technologies, or on how wireless networks interact with people’s electronics, as devices are constantly looking for Wi-Fi connectivity.

In 2015, another group of researchers led by Mostofi demonstrated how off-the-shelf Wi-Fi equipment can be used to count the number of people in a group without the need for any additional equipment. But the technique demonstrated had one major limitation. She required all of these people to walk in a specific area, creating measurable interruptions in the Wi-Fi signal.

Now Mostofi and her team have demonstrated a new technique that can count even motionless people by analyzing tiny unconscious movements. As with the previous method, the Wi-Fi transmitter and receiver are placed on either side of a space filled with people sitting or standing still, and by measuring and tracking tiny fluctuations in Wi-Fi signal strength, periods of high and low activity in a room, you can determine the number of those present.

But the data collected from the Wi-Fi receiver is not complete. If five people in a room out of 10 are fidgeting at the same time, the data simply shows a so-called “crowd restless period” (periods of inactivity are instead called “crowd silence”) without providing real information about how many people are actually moving. To calculate the headcount, the researchers had to develop a new mathematical model using queuing theory.

After testing the new technology for counting people using Wi-Fi in 47 experiments, the accuracy turned out to be very high – 96.3% of the time, the estimated number of people sitting in space was either accurate or deviated by one. Accuracy dropped to 90% when Wi-Fi signals passed through walls.

The ability to accurately count the number of people in a space can come in handy in various cases, for example, to track the number of visitors in restaurants and other establishments in order to contain the spread of the virus. Or increasing the accuracy of smart heating and cooling systems, allowing the temperature to be raised or lowered based on the number of people in the room.

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Security

17-year-old hacker who allegedly leaked GTA 6 gameplay videos online arrested in UK

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17 year old hacker who allegedly leaked GTA 6 gameplay videos online

London police today announced the capture of a 17-year-old teenager suspected of cybercrime in Oxfordshire. At the moment, it is only reported that the arrested person is in custody.

17-year-old hacker who allegedly leaked GTA 6 gameplay videos online arrested in UK

The police declined to say what caused the arrest, but a number of facts indicate that this particular teenager, associated with the Lapsus$ hacker group, previously hacked into Uber, and recently posted screenshots and videos of GTA 6 gameplay on the Web.

In March, Bloomberg wrote that the person believed to be behind several major network hacks was a 16-year-old teenager whose home is in Oxfordshire. Uber wrote on its blog after the hack: “We believe this attacker (or attackers) is associated with a hacker group called Lapsus$, which is becoming more and more active.” A hacker who posted a GTA 6 video online claimed responsibility for the attack on Uber in forum posts.

Recall, yesterday it became known that the FBI joined the investigation into the hacking of Uber and the publication of GTA 6 materials online.

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Gaming

The security specialist was able to “hack” the PS5 through the same vulnerability that he used to jailbreak the PS4

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The security specialist was able to hack the PS5 through

Security specialist Andy Nguyen was able to bypass the protection of the PS5 game console and “hack” it using an old vulnerability that he also used on the PS4. It concerns the features of the exFAT file system in Sony’s implementation. In 2020, Nguyen managed to jailbreak his PS4 using the same vulnerability. As a result, the specialist received full access to the system core.

The security specialist was able to

The researcher suggested that during the transition from FreeBSD9 to FreeBSD11, the patch that closed the vulnerability somehow stopped working or was removed during the upgrade. The specialist has already reported the vulnerability to the company, which paid him $10,000. The same amount Nguyen received for the same vulnerability on PS4.

The PlayStation hack allows the user to install emulators of other consoles, play pirated versions of games, and also unlock some features that are not normally available to users.

At the same time, Nguyen explained that the error he discovered was just one of a chain of errors required for a full PlayStation 5 jailbreak. To date, the newest console has not been hacked.

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Phones

Only pin code, only hardcore. Locking a smartphone with a fingerprint reduces its security, says Group-IB digital forensics specialist

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Only pin code only hardcore Locking a smartphone with a

Group-IB digital forensics specialist Igor Mikhailov told the Prime agency why you should not use a fingerprint on your phone.

According to him, locking a smartphone with a fingerprint reduces its security, as the fingerprint can be copied. In addition, it is possible to unlock the gadget with someone else’s fingerprints, especially on devices with an old sensor.

Only pin code, only hardcore.  Locking a smartphone with a fingerprint reduces its security, says Group-IB digital forensics specialist

The most secure way to unlock a smartphone, according to Mikhailov, is to use complex passwords. He advised to turn off the fingerprint login and leave only the pin code.

As for unlocking a smartphone by face, Apple’s Face ID system is the most reliable, but even its enthusiasts managed to deceive with photos and masks of the owners.

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