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Video cards not only rise in price but also disappear Video cards not only rise in price but also disappear

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Video cards not only rise in price, but also disappear from sale again

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We have already said that video cards began to rise in price again, and some models grew very noticeably in a month and a half. New data tells us about the average markup for AMD and Nvidia adapters.

According to the source, in Europe as a whole, the average markup for the current generation of Radeon video cards is 74%, and for GeForce cards – 70%. That is, there is not much difference, but in the last three months the mark-up is higher for the “red” models. And the markups have grown significantly since July-August and are now at the level of February this year.

Video cards not only become more expensive, but also disappear from sale again

At the same time, the closer the end of the year, the worse the situation with accessibility. Of course, there are still more maps than in spring or even more so last winter, but already less than in late spring and early summer.

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The Ryzen 9 7950X is far ahead of the Core i9-13900K, consuming significantly less power. Processors appeared in the OCCT database

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The Ryzen 9 7950X is far ahead of the Core

The OCCT benchmark database has been updated with the results of the already released Ryzen 9 7950X and the not yet released Core i9-13900K.

The Ryzen 9 7950X is far ahead of the Core i9-13900K, consuming significantly less power.  Processors appeared in the OCCT database

In this case, we are talking mainly about overclocked CPUs, and in this particular benchmark, the AMD flagship easily leads.

The best score for the Ryzen 9 7950X is 3073 points, there are also scores of 2633 and 2976 points. In this case, the CPU consumed from 196 to 218 watts.

The Core i9-13900K scores between 2247 and 2421 points while consuming 253 to 320 watts. That is, the result is significantly less, and energy consumption is much higher. Of course, this is just one benchmark, and it’s hard to say how accurate its consumption measurements are, but it’s worth remembering that the Ryzen 9 7950X consumes about the same level as the Core i9-12900K or even less, while the Core i9-13900K has more cores and runs on higher frequencies.

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Yes, the Ryzen 7000 gets very hot, but the Ryzen 5 7600X is quite enough to run the usual inexpensive cooler

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Yes the Ryzen 7000 gets very hot but the Ryzen

The Ryzen 7000 processors proved to be very productive, but also quite hot. Power consumption and temperatures have grown to about the level of Intel Alder Lake, and this affects the choice of cooling system. Can a regular AMD box cooler even handle a six-core Ryzen 5 7600X?

Yes, the Ryzen 7000 gets very hot, but the Ryzen 5 7600X is quite enough to run the usual inexpensive cooler

Despite the fact that this CPU has only six cores and power consumption in the range of 90 W, in many tests, even with liquid cooling, it heated up to 90 degrees and above. However, it turned out that everything is not so simple.

Our colleagues at TechSpot decided to try out the Wraith Spire cooler and were surprised by the results.

Yes, the Ryzen 7000 gets very hot, but the Ryzen 5 7600X is quite enough to run the usual inexpensive cooler

Yes, the Ryzen 7000 gets very hot, but the Ryzen 5 7600X is quite enough to run the usual inexpensive cooler

So, if you do not perform any manipulations with the CPU, then, for example, in Cinebench R23, a processor with a boxed cooler scores 5% less points than with a GSO due to a 3% drop in frequency. At the same time, the temperature rises from 93 to 101 degrees, that is, not so much, given the difference in performance between the coolers.

Also for the Ryzen 7000, you can activate Eco Mode, which reduces the power limit to 65 watts. This allows you to reduce the temperature by 7-16 degrees, depending on the cooler, and the performance drops by literally 1.5-4%. It is also possible to activate the PBO2 mode with reduced voltage, which results in a less significant decrease in temperature, but performance is even improved, albeit only by 2%. As for power consumption, it drops by 24% in Eco Mode.

Yes, the Ryzen 7000 gets very hot, but the Ryzen 5 7600X is quite enough to run the usual inexpensive cooler

In games, the situation is different. They do not load the processor so much, therefore, the power consumption in most cases is very modest (about 60-80 W), and temperatures rarely reach even 60 degrees, that is, they are in a completely normal range.

As a result, we can state that even a cooler of the Wraith Spire level is enough for stable operation of the Ryzen 5 7600X with an almost imperceptible decrease in performance and a not very significant increase in temperature. However, this raises questions about the temperature regime of the Ryzen 7000 as a whole, because the difference (in CPU heating) between a fairly simple air cooler and liquid CO turns out to be insignificant, and this is strange. Exactly what architectural features or settings of the Ryzen 7000 lead to operation at such high temperatures, even with LSO, is not yet clear. Especially when you consider the rather modest power consumption, because it turns out that the Ryzen 5 7600X heats up to 100 degrees, consuming only about 90 watts.

Yes, the Ryzen 7000 gets very hot, but the Ryzen 5 7600X is quite enough to run the usual inexpensive cooler

But it is also worth understanding that such a situation will only occur in a number of applications that can fully load all the CPU cores, while in the same games both temperature and power consumption do not raise questions.

If you still want to lower the processor temperature, you can activate Eco Mode, which has almost no effect on performance.

Separately, it is worth recalling the words of AMD itself regarding the temperature regime of the Ryzen 7000. The company did not go into details regarding the reasons, only mentioning the 5 nm process technology, but assured that 95 degrees for new CPUs are the norm. The processor will strive to increase the frequencies as much as possible, remaining within the same 95 degrees, regardless of the CO used. At the same time, this temperature is not dangerous for the CPU, and only at 105 degrees the throttling process is activated.

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Ryzen 7000 Thermal Grease Protection Introduced. Noctua NA-TPG1 Frame $8

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Ryzen 7000 Thermal Grease Protection Introduced Noctua NA TPG1 Frame 8

Ryzen 7000 processors have an unusually shaped cover, which is why applying thermal paste to CPU data has its own nuances.

Ryzen 7000 Thermal Grease Protection Introduced. Noctua NA-TPG1 Frame $8

Noctua decided to help buyers of such processors and introduced a special protection against excess thermal paste. The product is called NA-TPG1 and costs $8.

NA-TPG1 is just a plastic frame with a cutout in the shape of newer CPUs. It is enough just to put this frame on the processor before applying thermal paste and installing the cooler. If the thermal paste turns out to be more than necessary and the CO pressure squeezes it out, it will remain on the frame and will not get between the teeth of the CPU cover, from where it is quite difficult to remove.

Ryzen 7000 Thermal Grease Protection Introduced. Noctua NA-TPG1 Frame $8

NA-TPG1 is available on its own for $8, or bundled with NT-H1 or NT-H2 thermal pastes for $10 and $14 respectively.

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