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New York authorities want to use AI to track noise

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The bill will allow the government to deploy sound recording and analyzing devices in the city.

New York Legislature Submitted bill allowing police departments to use radar and artificial intelligence systems to track traffic-related noise levels in a city. In case of violation of the new law, the owners of loud cars could face a fine of $ 500.

The bill will allow the government to deploy sound recording and analyzing devices to various points in the city. The equipment will be used to assist police in identifying and fining vehicle owners who violate urban noise regulations.

According to the authorities, the surveillance will only target cars and will not affect “a person walking down the street with a tape recorder on his shoulder.”

The text of the bill does not indicate which device will be used by the police. Instead, NYPD will be allowed to test a range of different sound detection technologies, including acoustic monitoring (which is used to study wildlife) and beamforming technology (sensor-based sound analysis), as well as other artificial intelligence-based capabilities. The device will also undergo an annual “calibration check”.

According to the bill, the data collected by the program is not available for use in other criminal investigations. The data will also be destroyed after the culprit pays the fine.

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Top cybersecurity M&A deals in 2021

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The cybersecurity market in 2021 is incredibly hot. Information security service providers buy competitors to gain a foothold, or acquire companies to expand their offerings.

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Want to learn how to work with cloud databases and take the DP-900 certification exam for free?

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Take a two-day training session from Microsoft on October 25 and 26.

From Microsoft experts, you will learn about the key principles of Azure services, proven approaches, and the specifics of working with relational and non-relational data.

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Women and minorities are more likely to be cyberattacks than other people

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Women are more likely than men to receive messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links.

Demographics play a large role in how often people are victims of cybercrime. Low-income and vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by cybercrime. As the results showed poll 5 thousand people in Germany, the UK and the US, conducted by experts from Malwarebytes, Digitunity and Cybercrime Support Network, minorities, as well as groups of people with low income and low educational level, are more likely to be victims of a cyber attack. Some groups are much more likely to face online threats.

For example, women are much more likely to receive text messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links than men (79% versus 73%). Almost half (46%) of women said their social media accounts had been hacked, compared with 37% of men.

Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) social media accounts are more likely to be attacked than whites (45% versus 40%); BIPOC populations are also more likely to experience identity theft (21% versus 15%). In fact, only 47% of BIPOC respondents escaped the financial consequences of cybercriminals.

Age is also an important factor. 36% of people aged 65 and over have been victims of credit card information theft.

21% of women and 23% of BIPOC respondents experienced “significant” stress when faced with suspicious online activity.

According to the report, the statistics are linked to the overall sense of security (or lack thereof) in cyberspace. While half of all respondents do not feel secure online and 31% do not feel safe online, the numbers are different for women. Women feel the least private online (53% versus 47% of men) and the least secure (35% versus 27% of men).

Socioeconomic class also matters. People with higher incomes (51%) feel more secure online than people with lower incomes (40%). The same is true for educational attainment – users with the highest educational attainment feel more secure (48%) than those who graduated only from college (44%) or high school (40%).

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