Connect with us
NASA will send the LuSEE Night telescope to the far side NASA will send the LuSEE Night telescope to the far side

News

NASA will send the LuSEE-Night telescope to the far side of the Moon. Its calibrator will allow you to achieve unprecedented measurement accuracy with an error of 1%

Published

on

A scientific project called LuSEE-Night promises to open new horizons in the study of the Universe. As part of this project, it is planned to launch a radio telescope to the far side of the Moon in 2026. The uniqueness of this mission is in a ruthless, but promising scientific reward environment. Scientific instruments placed on the Moon will be able to collect the remaining radio waves of the ancient Universe, opening a window into an era of space that has never been observed before.

However, the project faces a serious challenge – calibrating the LuSEE-Night radio telescope. This is necessary to ensure accurate measurements and prepare the way for more complex telescopes beyond Earth. Calibration is usually performed using various techniques, but in the case of LuSEE-Night it presents significant difficulties. Unlike optical telescopes, which can move and focus on stars, a lunar telescope will be completely stationary and operate with stationary antennas. This complicates the process of comparing measurements of known and unknown space objects needed to fine-tune the system.

NASA will send the LuSEE-Night telescope to the far side of the Moon.  Its calibrator will allow you to achieve unprecedented measurement accuracy with an error of 1%

Render of the LuSEE-Night telescope calibration process. Source: Firefly Aerospace

Similar problems arise in the case of using terrestrial radio telescopes. To calibrate the instrument, scientists typically send an artificial radio source mounted on a drone above the telescope. But the way drones move and their susceptibility to veering off course makes it difficult to get accurate measurements. It is in this regard that NASA decided to use a special calibrator in lunar orbit.

“The calibrator will be a complex radio frequency transmitter with a downward-facing antenna. It will orbit the Moon and emit a signal and LuSEE-Night will receive it,” explained Paul O’Connor, senior scientist at Brookhaven Laboratory and project scientist for LuSEE-Night.

To achieve this ambitious mission, NASA has awarded a contract to Firefly Aerospace, which will be responsible for launching LuSEE-Night. This is the first time NASA has turned to suppliers on the CLPS program list to develop and launch a calibrator. LuSEE-Night will be another illustration of cooperation between public and private companies in the scientific field.

The calibrator, which will be used as part of the LuSEE-Night mission, will help accurately measure the amount of cosmic radiation coming from different directions. This will allow scientists to understand various aspects of the instrument’s operation, including its sensitivity to polarization and interaction with lunar regolith.

The collaboration between scientists and LuSEE-Night will ensure “absolute calibration” of the telescope. As one of the project participants notes, such accuracy is rarely achieved on Earth, let alone on the Moon. The researchers expect that using a calibrator will reduce measurement error from 20% to about 1%.

The basic calibration technique is similar to that used on drones, but it will be more accurate. Unlike an intermittent signal that would have to be isolated from the noise of space, the calibrator will send out a known signal that can be easily identified even in the presence of the brighter radiation from our galaxy.

The calibrator, like the LuSEE-Night telescope, will be delivered to the Moon on the same vehicle. First, landing and communications equipment will be detached and transferred to lunar orbit. The lander will then deliver the telescope to the lunar surface, while the communications module and calibrator will remain in orbit.

Five days after LuSEE-Night lands on the far side of the Moon, the calibrator will be turned on remotely to verify its correct operation. Because the lander will continue to emit interference, the early data will require careful analysis. However, as soon as the first lunar sunset occurs and the lander turns off, a new stage of operation of the LuSEE-Night telescope will begin. The ultimate goal is to collect enough data over 50 Earth days to achieve a calibration with an error of up to 1%.

After the second lunar night, the calibrator will be turned off, since in addition to performing the calibration function, this launch is also an important international event. The side of the Moon facing away from Earth is one of the quietest places in our solar system. This is why international treaties have been concluded prohibiting the use of radio frequencies below 300 MHz on the surface of the Moon. However, since the calibrator will emit radio frequencies, temporary approval must be obtained from the International Telecommunication Union. In this case, the calibrator will work for one and a half lunar days, or 50 Earth days, before it has to be turned off.

At the end of these 50 Earth days, Brookhaven Laboratory scientists will conduct one of the most ambitious radio cosmology experiments in history. The goal of their work is to find answers to some of the most mysterious questions of the Universe, including the origin of the universe itself.

If all plans are successfully implemented, the LuSEE-Night mission will open up new opportunities for scientists to study the Universe and provide an opportunity to look into the most distant times and spaces. This will be an important step in understanding the cosmos and its evolution.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Car News

Hyundai Creta N Line 2024 sports car declassified

Published

on

Hyundai Creta N Line 2024 sports car declassified

The sportiest version of the recently updated Hyundai Creta crossover has been declassified in India: orders for the Hyundai Creta N Line 2024 in the local market are already being accepted, but the official premiere will take place on March 11.

Hyundai Creta N Line 2024 sports car declassified

Judging by the photo, the crossover received more aggressive bumpers, a different radiator grille, and red accents on the body and interior design. Wheels will be 18 inches. According to Autocar India, the car will be offered in two trim levels: base and top-end. Accordingly, the first will have a manual gearbox, the second will have a robotic one. But there is only one engine – the most powerful: a 1.5-liter gasoline turbo engine with 160 hp.

Hyundai Creta N Line 2024 sports car declassified

Hyundai Creta N Line 2024 sports car declassified

Prices will be announced on the day of the premiere, but it is already clear that the Creta N Line will be the most expensive in the lineup.

Continue Reading

News

How much does it cost to repair Xiaomi 14 Ultra? The official price list for spare parts has been published

Published

on

How much does it cost to repair Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Xiaomi 14 Ultra has just gone on sale in China, but Xiaomi has already published the official price list for spare parts so that users understand how much it will cost to repair the device out of warranty.

How much does it cost to repair Xiaomi 14 Ultra?  The official price list for spare parts has been published

Despite the fact that Xiaomi 14 Ultra is currently the pinnacle of the Chinese company’s smartphone manufacturing, repair prices are approximately at the level of other flagships. Replacing the motherboard will cost the most – from 380 to 420 dollars, depending on the amount of memory soldered on it. Out-of-warranty replacement of the screen will cost $190, battery – $25, back cover – $40. Replacing the front camera is $10, speaker replacement is $5.

As for the camera, this is interesting. Replacing the main module with an inch Sony LYT-900 image sensor will cost $140! Replacement of a module with an ultra-wide-angle lens is $70, replacement of a module with a telephoto lens is only $25. And this is quite strange, since these modules use the same Sony IMX858 sensors, and the module with a telephoto lens is more complex due to the presence of an OIS system.

Continue Reading

Components

A mini PC weighing only 660 grams with an 8-core Ryzen 7 7840HS, 32 GB of RAM, a built-in screen and a fingerprint scanner – for $515. Tianbao GEM12 introduced

Published

on

A mini PC weighing only 660 grams with an 8 core

An atypical mini-computer went on sale on the Chinese marketplace JD.com. The creators of the device, called Tianbao GEM12, integrated a small screen and even a fingerprint scanner into the body, which can work as part of the Windows Hello biometric identification function.

A mini PC weighing only 660 grams with an 8-core Ryzen 7 7840HS, 32 GB of RAM, a built-in screen and a fingerprint scanner - for $515.  Tianbao GEM12 introduced

The hardware basis of Tianbao GEM12 is an 8-core 16-thread Ryzen 7 7840HS processor with a Radeon 780M graphics core. The device is sold as a DIY kit for $350 or as a pre-configured system: 16GB/512GB for $430 and 32GB/1TB for $515.

A mini PC weighing only 660 grams with an 8-core Ryzen 7 7840HS, 32 GB of RAM, a built-in screen and a fingerprint scanner - for $515.  Tianbao GEM12 introduced

A mini PC weighing only 660 grams with an 8-core Ryzen 7 7840HS, 32 GB of RAM, a built-in screen and a fingerprint scanner - for $515.  Tianbao GEM12 introduced

The mini-PC cooling system has two heat pipes and one fan. The screen is used to display the time, album covers when playing music, and processor load. There is an integrated 2.5 Gbps wired Ethernet adapter with two RJ-45 ports and a module that implements Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth 5.2 communications.

A mini PC weighing only 660 grams with an 8-core Ryzen 7 7840HS, 32 GB of RAM, a built-in screen and a fingerprint scanner - for $515.  Tianbao GEM12 introduced

Dimensions of the computer: 130 x 130 x 60 mm, weight: 660 grams.

Continue Reading

Most Popular