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Irish regulator fined WhatsApp 225 million euros

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The Irish Commission obliged the American messenger to pay compensation due to the lack of transparency in the process of processing personal data of users.

The Irish Data Protection Commission has ordered the American messenger WhatsApp to pay a fine of € 225 million for the lack of transparency in the processing of personal data. Bloomberg reported this on Thursday.

Based on the results of an investigation opened in December 2018, the commission concluded that the company did not comply with the transparency requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), according to the regulator’s website.

The claims against WhatsApp primarily relate to how the messenger informs users about what it does with their personal information, including the procedure for transferring it to other companies in the Facebook family of applications.

WhatsApp said they would appeal the decision of the commission. According to the company, the punishment is disproportionate, and the messenger provides safe services and provides transparent information about them.

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Top cybersecurity M&A deals in 2021

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The cybersecurity market in 2021 is incredibly hot. Information security service providers buy competitors to gain a foothold, or acquire companies to expand their offerings.

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Want to learn how to work with cloud databases and take the DP-900 certification exam for free?

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Take a two-day training session from Microsoft on October 25 and 26.

From Microsoft experts, you will learn about the key principles of Azure services, proven approaches, and the specifics of working with relational and non-relational data.

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Women and minorities are more likely to be cyberattacks than other people

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Women are more likely than men to receive messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links.

Demographics play a large role in how often people are victims of cybercrime. Low-income and vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by cybercrime. As the results showed poll 5 thousand people in Germany, the UK and the US, conducted by experts from Malwarebytes, Digitunity and Cybercrime Support Network, minorities, as well as groups of people with low income and low educational level, are more likely to be victims of a cyber attack. Some groups are much more likely to face online threats.

For example, women are much more likely to receive text messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links than men (79% versus 73%). Almost half (46%) of women said their social media accounts had been hacked, compared with 37% of men.

Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) social media accounts are more likely to be attacked than whites (45% versus 40%); BIPOC populations are also more likely to experience identity theft (21% versus 15%). In fact, only 47% of BIPOC respondents escaped the financial consequences of cybercriminals.

Age is also an important factor. 36% of people aged 65 and over have been victims of credit card information theft.

21% of women and 23% of BIPOC respondents experienced “significant” stress when faced with suspicious online activity.

According to the report, the statistics are linked to the overall sense of security (or lack thereof) in cyberspace. While half of all respondents do not feel secure online and 31% do not feel safe online, the numbers are different for women. Women feel the least private online (53% versus 47% of men) and the least secure (35% versus 27% of men).

Socioeconomic class also matters. People with higher incomes (51%) feel more secure online than people with lower incomes (40%). The same is true for educational attainment – users with the highest educational attainment feel more secure (48%) than those who graduated only from college (44%) or high school (40%).

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