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In Avito you can now link multiple profiles In Avito you can now link multiple profiles

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In “Avito” you can now link multiple profiles

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The team of the popular private ad service “Avito” announced the launch of a new useful feature. Users can now link multiple accounts – regular and professional. Profiles will remain separate, but it will become more convenient to work with them.

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You can literally switch between linked accounts in a couple of clicks. In this case, you do not need to enter a password and phone number every time. Linked accounts have the same login information: password and phone number.

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Illustration: “Avito”

“Verification of documents” in one of the accounts affects all. Also, if a client contacts you on one profile, they won’t know about your ads on another.

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Illustration: “Avito”

The new feature has already become available in test mode to some users. The developers plan to make it available to everyone within a year.

Andrey Rybintsev, director of the Trust&Safety division, explained:

The new tool will be useful to users who actively use Avito for various tasks and would like to differentiate their activities. When developing new functionality, we focused on simplicity and ease of use. So, you can switch without authorization, use the same phone number, go through document verification once for all profiles. With the advent of linked profiles, the problem associated with the fact that users had to create accounts for different tasks disappears. The innovation will allow us to ensure not only comfort, but also the safety of users.

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JuMBO objects in the Orion Nebula: A discovery that pushes the boundaries of traditional understanding of both stars and planets

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JuMBO objects in the Orion Nebula A discovery that pushes

Last year, astronomers studying the Orion Nebula with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) discovered interesting planetary mass objects floating freely in the region. This discovery cast doubt on established ideas about the formation of planets and stars. Fresh research has added new depth to the mystery surrounding these objects, which are called JuMBOs – Jupiter-mass binary objects.

JuMBOs are neither stars nor planets. They were initially discovered by Mark McCaughreen, a senior scientific adviser to the European Space Agency (ESA), and his colleagues. These objects were spotted in the Orion Nebula, which is located approximately 1,350 light-years from Earth and is the birthplace of new stars.

JuMBO objects in the Orion Nebula: A discovery that pushes the boundaries of traditional understanding of both stars and planets

Illustration of Jupiter-mass binary objects (JuMBOs) in the Orion Nebula. Source: Gemini Observatory / Jon Lomberg

To further study JuMBO, the researchers used data collected by the Very Large Array of 27 radio telescopes at the US National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Of all 40 detected by JuMBO, radio signals were detected from only one pair of objects.

Of particular interest is the “JuMBO 24” pair. Researchers note that both objects in this pair have a mass exceeding the mass of the planet Jupiter by 11 times. This makes them the most massive objects of this type recorded by JWST. The mass of the remaining JuMBOs exceeds the mass of the most massive planet in the solar system in the range from 3 to 8 times.

The observed JuMBO radio signals had significantly higher intensity compared to radio signals characteristic of brown dwarfs. Brown dwarfs are objects that had the potential to become stars, but did not gain enough mass to fuse hydrogen into helium in their cores, as our Sun does. Brown dwarfs typically range in mass from 13 to 75 Jupiter masses.

JuMBOs are hot, gaseous, and relatively small objects that exist in pairs. This makes them unusual, since it has traditionally been assumed that only massive stars are most likely to exist in binary systems, rather than less powerful stellar bodies. About 75% of massive stars are in binary systems, with this percentage falling to 50% for stars the size of the Sun and 25% for the smallest stars. Therefore, the probability of detecting brown dwarfs in binary systems approaches zero. JuMBOs, which have a mass lower than that of brown dwarfs, would not exist in binary systems if they were formed as stars.

But if JuMBOs are formed as stars, then the sheer number of them found in Orion suggests that the frequency of binary stellar objects for some reason increases significantly at masses below the masses of brown dwarfs. This cannot yet be taken into account in star formation models.

If planetary mass objects cannot be explained by existing models of star formation, then they may be born as planets. However, JuMBO pairs are difficult to explain if they formed as planets from leftover material in the disks left behind by their parent stars.

Some planets are known to be expelled from their parent star systems as a result of gravitational effects such as collisions with other star systems. As a result, they become “rogue planets”—objects without a parent star, much like the JuMBO in the Orion Nebula. However, the process that produces these “rogue planets” must destroy gravitationally bound pairs of planets.

Researchers cannot yet explain why JuMBO ended up in pairs. What complicates efforts to explain is that some of these pairs are located at great distances from each other. For example, one pair of JuMBOs is located 300 times the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Other pairs are separated by the scale of the Solar System, indicating a weak gravitational connection between them.

Rodriguez and his colleagues were very familiar with Orion, having previously studied the nebula using the Virtual Radio Telescope (VLA). So, when JuMBOs appeared in JWST’s infrared data, the team decided to look through archived radio wave observations to find radio wave counterparts for these objects.

“We took data from the VLA archive and calibrated it and found JuMBO in all three “epochs” of data. We detected radio wave emissions from the most massive JuMBO binary, but it is unclear why the others were not detected in radio wave observations,” Rodriguez said.

The team believes that other JuMBOs may also emit radio waves because their components are smaller than the two 11-Jupiter mass objects in the JuMBO 24 binary system. The scientists hope to deepen their knowledge of JuMBOs through deeper models and further observations. One hypothesis suggests that JuMBOs move quickly, which may indicate their formation as planets around stars and subsequent ejection from the system. Alternatively, JuMBOs may be formed from massive clouds of gas and dust, similar to stars. Any explanation would prompt a rethinking of how stars and planets form and evolve in their systems.

Rodriguez refutes suggestions that radio signals from JuMBO 24 indicate signs of life. He notes that it is possible that if JuMBO had satellites, life in their subsurface oceans could exist similar to that proposed on Europa, Ganymede and Enceladus. However, due to JuMBO’s youth (only a few million years old compared to Earth’s 4.6 billion years), the likelihood of life developing is now low.

Scientists continue to study JuMBOs and their characteristics to further our understanding of planet formation and evolution. However, JuMBOs are not promising candidates for the search for life outside the solar system.

So while JuMBOs may be the astronomical discovery of the 2020s and interesting targets for scientists who want to better understand the formation of stars and planets, they may not be targets for the search for life beyond the solar system.

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A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra

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A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14

Popular Chinese actor Zhang Songwen (Zhang Songwen, starred in the film “Game of Shadows”, as well as the dramas “Bad Children” and “Knockout”) published a series of pictures taken on the Xiaomi 14 Ultra camera on the Weibo social network. Before this, Zhang Songwen used the “titanium” Xiaomi 14 Pro, and now he has replaced this model with the latest Xiaomi flagship.

A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra

A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra
A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra
A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra
A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra
A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra
A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra
A popular Chinese actor showed how he films Xiaomi 14 Ultra

Zhang Songwen’s love for Xiaomi devices is not accidental – he is a brand ambassador. The photos hardly demonstrate any special approach to composition, but they make it easier to understand what a smartphone camera is capable of. In addition, most of these images were taken in difficult conditions with insufficient light.

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Nvidia calls Huawei its competitor for the first time

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Nvidia calls Huawei its competitor for the first time

As reported by Reuters, Nvidia for the first time named Huawei as its main competitor. Nvidia wrote about this in its filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission late on Wednesday. The document listed Huawei as a major competitor in several categories.

Nvidia calls Huawei its competitor for the first time

Nvidia believes it is competing with Huawei in making artificial intelligence chips. Nvidia’s other competitive areas include the production of graphics processors, central processing units and networking chips. In the document, Nvidia described Huawei as a company that provides cloud services and develops its own computing hardware and software for artificial intelligence systems.

Nvidia did not explain what it means by calling Huawei a competitor. The Chinese company does have a line of accelerators for AI tasks, but the main solution – Ascend 910B – competes with the Nvidia A100 GPU from three years ago.

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