Connect with us

Hacked version of Lightning cable lets you steal credentials

Published

on

OMG Cable is similar to Apple’s Lightning cable, but also has the ability to steal and send data to an attacker.

Cybersecurity researcher using the pseudonym MG, developed a new version of OMG Cable that can be used to steal credentials.

OMG Cable is a cable that not only charges phones and transfers data similar to Apple’s Lightning cable, but can also log keystrokes from connected Mac, iPad and iPhone keyboards and then send that data to an attacker. The cable creates a Wi-Fi hotspot that a hacker can connect to.

The cable also contains a geofencing feature that allows the device’s payload to be triggered or locked based on its location, preventing the payload or keystrokes from leaking from other connected devices. Other features include the ability to change the keyboard layout and the ability to spoof the credentials of USB devices.

The cable contains a small implanted chip and is physically the same size as the original cable, making it extremely difficult to detect a tamper. The implant itself takes up about half the length of the plastic sheath of the USB-C connector, allowing the cable to continue operating normally.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Security

Top cybersecurity M&A deals in 2021

Published

on

The cybersecurity market in 2021 is incredibly hot. Information security service providers buy competitors to gain a foothold, or acquire companies to expand their offerings.

Continue Reading

Security

Want to learn how to work with cloud databases and take the DP-900 certification exam for free?

Published

on

Take a two-day training session from Microsoft on October 25 and 26.

From Microsoft experts, you will learn about the key principles of Azure services, proven approaches, and the specifics of working with relational and non-relational data.

Have time sign up for training

Continue Reading

Security

Women and minorities are more likely to be cyberattacks than other people

Published

on

Women are more likely than men to receive messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links.

Demographics play a large role in how often people are victims of cybercrime. Low-income and vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by cybercrime. As the results showed poll 5 thousand people in Germany, the UK and the US, conducted by experts from Malwarebytes, Digitunity and Cybercrime Support Network, minorities, as well as groups of people with low income and low educational level, are more likely to be victims of a cyber attack. Some groups are much more likely to face online threats.

For example, women are much more likely to receive text messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links than men (79% versus 73%). Almost half (46%) of women said their social media accounts had been hacked, compared with 37% of men.

Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) social media accounts are more likely to be attacked than whites (45% versus 40%); BIPOC populations are also more likely to experience identity theft (21% versus 15%). In fact, only 47% of BIPOC respondents escaped the financial consequences of cybercriminals.

Age is also an important factor. 36% of people aged 65 and over have been victims of credit card information theft.

21% of women and 23% of BIPOC respondents experienced “significant” stress when faced with suspicious online activity.

According to the report, the statistics are linked to the overall sense of security (or lack thereof) in cyberspace. While half of all respondents do not feel secure online and 31% do not feel safe online, the numbers are different for women. Women feel the least private online (53% versus 47% of men) and the least secure (35% versus 27% of men).

Socioeconomic class also matters. People with higher incomes (51%) feel more secure online than people with lower incomes (40%). The same is true for educational attainment – users with the highest educational attainment feel more secure (48%) than those who graduated only from college (44%) or high school (40%).

Continue Reading

Most Popular