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Cloudflare explains how it helps fight piracy Cloudflare explains how it helps fight piracy

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Cloudflare explains how it helps fight piracy

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American copyright holders complain about Cloudflare for promoting pirate sites.

American organizations representing copyright holders regularly criticize Cloudflare for helping pirate sites hide the location of their hosting, but the company itself paints a very different picture.

Organizations like the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) are members of the Cloudflare Trusted Notifier program, whereby they can receive information about pirated sites during several hours, including their IP addresses. However, not all copyright holders are careful about this confidential information.

Earlier this month, several copyright holders submitted their annual Notorious Markets report to the United States Trade Representative (USTR).

The report provides lists of pirated sites, apps and services, but Cloudflare is also frequently mentioned. Officially, the US provider of web security and infrastructure cannot be listed in the report as it is not a foreign company. However, copyright holders did not fail to seize the opportunity to accuse the content distribution network (CDN) of promoting pirate sites.

The Film Industry Association of America, for example, noted that Cloudflare can mask the IP addresses and hosting providers of sites. This allows operators of pirate resources, including The Pirate Bay, to bypass the lock.

“Cloudflare’s clients include some of the most vile, long-standing sites in the world, including The Pirate Bay, whose current domain thepiratebay.org has been found to be in copyright infringement on nearly six million separate occasions. However, The Pirate Bay and other notorious pirate sites remain. Cloudflare customers, despite ongoing notifications of violations, “says the MPAA.

However, Cloudflare disagrees with this characteristic. Last week the company sent USTR rebuttal, hoping to dot the i’s. Cloudflare does not deny that it does “cover” IP addresses, but copyright holders have several ways to obtain this information.

For example, copyright holders can request information (IP addresses, billing information, and other account information) through a basic Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) subpoena, which requires only a signature judicial secretary. Last year alone, Cloudflare received 67 DMCA orders for hundreds of domains.

There are also more direct methods. When copyright holders file a copyright infringement complaint through the Cloudflare web form, the company provides the name of the hosting company that the site operators use.

Without a court order, a CDN provider can transmit detailed information about the hosting company whose services are used by sites allegedly infringing copyright. However, the IP address of the host is usually not shared as this type of sensitive information has been abused by attackers in the past.

“While we understand the importance of fighting copyright infringement, we do not believe that opening a website to cyber attacks is an appropriate or legally acceptable way to address the issue,” explained Cloudflare.

However, the company has a trusted notifier program whereby it can share host IP addresses with select partners who have proven a real need for the information requested and have adequately demonstrated a willingness and ability to secure the information and protect it from abuse. Trusted partners include the RIAA, MPAA and the Federation of the Swiss Watch Industry, who complained about Cloudflare in their USTR report.

It’s worth noting that the RIAA has already denied Cloudflare’s claim. The association confirmed the possibility of obtaining the IP addresses of pirate sites, but also noted that since Cloudflare informs its customers about this, pirate resources quickly change hosting providers before the RIAA can do anything.

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Vulnerability found in the Apple M1 processor that cannot be closed programmatically

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Vulnerability found in the Apple M1 processor that cannot be

Specialists from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said that they were able to develop a PACMAN attack technique, which is possible due to a hardware vulnerability in the Apple M1 processor. Moreover, it cannot be closed by software.

Vulnerability found in the Apple M1 processor that cannot be closed programmatically

The attack itself is carried out using software and hardware, and it can be performed remotely. The PACMAN attack makes it possible to gain access to the kernel of the operating system. At the same time, potentially the same vulnerabilities can be in Qualcomm and Samsung processors, but this has not yet been confirmed.

The technical side of the attack is based on the Pointer Authentication function. It is used to check Pointer Authentication Codes (PACs), allowing only code-signed software to run. However, the PACMAN method allows you to select the necessary PAC values. In part, this technique is similar to Specter and Meltdown in Intel processors.

At the same time, Apple spokesman Scott Radcliffe said that the vulnerability does not pose an immediate threat to users and is not sufficient in itself to bypass operating system protections.

A few years ago, a vulnerability was already found in Arm processors that allows an attacker to gain unauthorized access to data.

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Security

So much for Unisoc. Companies have discovered a vulnerability in single-chip systems

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So much for Unisoc Companies have discovered a vulnerability in

Unisoc is actively capturing the market for single-chip systems, although it does so exclusively in the budget segment itself. However, it turned out that these platforms have a critical vulnerability.

So much for Unisoc.  Companies have discovered a vulnerability in single-chip systems

According to the source, the problem is in the modem’s firmware and affects both 4G and 5G platforms. The vulnerability, numbered CVE-2022-20210, was discovered while scanning Non-Access Stratum (NAS) message handlers. This vulnerability could be used to neutralize or block the device’s cellular capabilities.

The vulnerability was first discovered in the Motorola Moto G20 smartphone based on the Unisoc T700 SoC. But in the end it turned out that the same vulnerability occurs in other platforms, however, the source did not provide a list.

The Check Point specialists who discovered the vulnerability notified Unisoc back in May, and the company has already released a fix, so smartphone owners should not worry now if they update the software of their devices.

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Security

New vulnerability in Microsoft Office is heavily exploited by hackers

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New vulnerability in Microsoft Office is heavily exploited by hackers

A serious vulnerability has been found in the Microsoft Office suite that could potentially allow attackers to execute arbitrary code.

New vulnerability in Microsoft Office is heavily exploited by hackers

She was assigned the number CVE-2022-30190, and among the researchers they gave the name Follina. As noted in Kaspersky Lab, the most unpleasant thing is that there is no fix yet, and in the meantime, the vulnerability is already being actively exploited by attackers. Vulnerability CVE-2022-30190 threatens all operating systems of the Windows family, both regular and server.

While the update is being developed, experts recommend that all Windows users and administrators take advantage of temporary workarounds. As a Microsoft workaround recommends disable the MSDT URL protocol.

The CVE-2022-30190 vulnerability itself is contained in the Microsoft Windows Support Diagnostic Tool (MSDT), but due to the implementation of this tool, a single malicious office document is enough to exploit the vulnerability.

The scheme could be like this. Attackers create a malicious office document and slip it to the victim, for example by sending an email with an attachment. The infected file contains a link to an HTML file that contains JavaScript code that executes malicious code on the command line via MSDT. As a result, attackers are able to install programs, view, modify or destroy data, as well as create new accounts – that is, do everything that the privileges of the user who opened the infected file allow.

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