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China accelerates 6G development

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China will speed up the creation and deployment of 5G technology, and accelerate the development of 6G, said Minister of Industry and Information Technology Jin Zhuanglong.

“Currently, China is at the forefront of global 5G development. There are more than 2.54 million 5G base stations installed in the country, and the number of 5G smartphone users has exceeded 575 million,” Jin said, adding that China will build 600,000 5G base stations this year.

He stated that 5G is used in more than half of the major industrial sectors, including mining, ports, power generation and aircraft manufacturing. He also called for expanding the application of ultra-fast wireless technology to more areas such as manufacturing.

China accelerates 6G development

He said that more than 10,000 5G-equipped factories will be built in the country from 2021 to 2025 as part of a broader campaign to support the application of 5G technology to the Industrial Internet.

China has already set up a 6G technology promotion group, which will accelerate the research and development of next-generation communication technology.

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Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

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Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar

Astronomers from Paul Sabatier University in France investigated the possible influence of nearby stars in the Milky Way on the solar system. They used the SIMBAD database, which contains information on stellar parallaxes and proper motions from the Gaia satellite, to search for so-called “Nemesis” stars – hypothetical companions of the Sun.

Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

Source: NASA/ESA/STScI.

The researchers turned their attention to stars that pass through the outer Oort Cloud, a region of the outer solar system that contains populations of icy cometary bodies. As a result of such close flybys, gravitational interactions between the star and comets can change the orbits of the outer planets and send comets into the solar system.

The Oort Cloud is a heterogeneous region with many icy cometary bodies, extending up to 3.2 light-years from the Sun. Inside the Oort Cloud lies the Kuiper Belt, which also contains comets and small bodies such as Pluto. There is also a region called the Hill Cloud located between the Oort Cloud and the Kuiper Belt. It is these regions that are the main sources of comets with long orbits.

Astronomers have been looking for stars that periodically come too close to the Solar System, pushing comets out of the Oort Cloud into the inner Solar System. Such close flybys occur approximately every hundred thousand years, with rarer events occurring every few million years when the star comes within about 52,000 astronomical units of the Sun. These events cause gravitational disturbances that lead to the ejection of cometary nuclei from their orbits and their subsequent movement into the depths of the outer solar system.

The researchers compiled a list of potential candidate stars based on data from the SIMBAD database. They also continue to study other stars that may periodically come too close to the solar system and affect the Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt. Establishing the precise orbits and movements of these stars will allow for a deeper understanding of the evolution and structure of the Solar System.

One possible “nemesis” was Scholz’s star, a red dwarf that is believed to have “grazed” the edge of the Oort Cloud about 70,000 years ago along with a brown dwarf companion. It is currently approximately 22 light-years from the Sun and has likely spawned a swarm of comets that will take over a million years to reach the inner Solar System. This approach could also affect the orbits of Kuiper Belt objects. Another star highlighted in this study is the G-type star HD 7977. It is located about 247 light-years from Earth and had a possible close encounter about 2.8 million years ago.

The Asirons are interested not only in events of the past, but also in future convergences. One likely approach is with the star Gliese 710. It is expected to fly past the Sun in about 1.29 million years at a distance of about 10,520 astronomical units. There is a high probability that it will pass through the Oort Cloud, which could lead to a shift in the flow of comets towards the Sun. Some researchers predict that this could result in about 10 naked-eye comets per year.

This study offers new insights into the influence of Milky Way stars on the solar system. Understanding these processes opens up new opportunities for studying the history and development of the Solar System, and also makes it possible to predict the future movement of cometary bodies.

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Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

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1708834752 571 Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar

Astronomers from Paul Sabatier University in France investigated the possible influence of nearby stars in the Milky Way on the solar system. They used the SIMBAD database, which contains information on stellar parallaxes and proper motions from the Gaia satellite, to search for so-called “Nemesis” stars – hypothetical companions of the Sun.

Astronomical study reveals interactions between Milky Way stars and solar system comets

Source: NASA/ESA/STScI.

The researchers turned their attention to stars that pass through the outer Oort Cloud, a region of the outer solar system that contains populations of icy cometary bodies. As a result of such close flybys, gravitational interactions between the star and comets can change the orbits of the outer planets and send comets into the solar system.

The Oort Cloud is a heterogeneous region with many icy cometary bodies, extending up to 3.2 light-years from the Sun. Inside the Oort Cloud lies the Kuiper Belt, which also contains comets and small bodies such as Pluto. There is also a region called the Hill Cloud located between the Oort Cloud and the Kuiper Belt. It is these regions that are the main sources of comets with long orbits.

Astronomers have been looking for stars that periodically come too close to the Solar System, pushing comets out of the Oort Cloud into the inner Solar System. Such close flybys occur approximately every hundred thousand years, with rarer events occurring every few million years when the star comes within about 52,000 astronomical units of the Sun. These events cause gravitational disturbances that lead to the ejection of cometary nuclei from their orbits and their subsequent movement into the depths of the outer solar system.

The researchers compiled a list of potential candidate stars based on data from the SIMBAD database. They also continue to study other stars that may periodically come too close to the solar system and affect the Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt. Establishing the precise orbits and movements of these stars will allow for a deeper understanding of the evolution and structure of the Solar System.

One possible “nemesis” was Scholz’s star, a red dwarf that is believed to have “grazed” the edge of the Oort Cloud about 70,000 years ago along with a brown dwarf companion. It is currently approximately 22 light-years from the Sun and has likely spawned a swarm of comets that will take over a million years to reach the inner Solar System. This approach could also affect the orbits of Kuiper Belt objects. Another star highlighted in this study is the G-type star HD 7977. It is located about 247 light-years from Earth and had a possible close encounter about 2.8 million years ago.

The Asirons are interested not only in events of the past, but also in future convergences. One likely approach is with the star Gliese 710. It is expected to fly past the Sun in about 1.29 million years at a distance of about 10,520 astronomical units. There is a high probability that it will pass through the Oort Cloud, which could lead to a shift in the flow of comets towards the Sun. Some researchers predict that this could result in about 10 naked-eye comets per year.

This study offers new insights into the influence of Milky Way stars on the solar system. Understanding these processes opens up new opportunities for studying the history and development of the Solar System, and also makes it possible to predict the future movement of cometary bodies.

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New study increases the role of cosmic dust in the emergence of life on Earth

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New study increases the role of cosmic dust in the

Life appeared surprisingly early on our planet, despite the fact that the early Earth lacked the necessary chemical components for life to arise.

New study increases the role of cosmic dust in the emergence of life on Earth

Artistic depiction of cosmic dust dissipating in a supernova explosion. Source: ESO / M. Kornmesser

Prebiotic chemicals such as sugars and amino acids are known to form in asteroids and comets. Therefore, scientists assumed that the Earth could be “seeded” with materials for life as a result of collisions with asteroids and comets. However, new research suggests that cosmic dust also played an important role in the emergence of life on the young planet.

It was previously thought that cosmic dust that accumulated on the Earth’s surface was not a major source of prebiotic material because it was dispersed throughout the planet, as opposed to being concentrated at comet and asteroid impact sites. A new study, however, has found that cosmic dust can accumulate and concentrate in sediments, creating favorable conditions for the emergence of life.

Scientists assessed the rate of accumulation of cosmic dust in the early period of the Earth and modeled its accumulation in the corresponding sedimentary layers. The results showed that the amount of dust accumulated in the sediments significantly exceeds the amount of prebiotic material carried by comets and asteroids. In addition, the researchers found that the processes of melting and freezing of glacial areas can significantly increase the concentration of chemicals in cosmic dust. For example, in early subglacial lakes the concentration of prebiotic material in the dust was much higher than at the sites of comet and asteroid impacts. These discoveries indicate that cosmic dust may have played a much more important role in the emergence of life than previously thought.

However, life on the early Earth and the mechanisms of its origin still remain mysteries. But certainly without the influence of extraterrestrial chemistry delivered by cosmic dust, life on Earth would be impossible. It is from dust that the building blocks of life arose, and it is because of this that we can today trace the emergence of living organisms on Earth to the early chemical composition of dust in the solar system.

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