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Can deepfakes affect elections MIT scientists come to unexpected conclusions Can deepfakes affect elections MIT scientists come to unexpected conclusions

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Can deepfakes affect elections? MIT scientists come to unexpected conclusions

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Experts have found out whether political videos are more convincing than their textual counterparts.

Since the advent of deepfakes, it has been expected that sooner or later these technologies will be used to influence elections. However, as the new study experts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), this can be more difficult than it sounds.

In the course of the study, experts wanted to find out if political videos are more convincing than their textual counterparts. The answer was quite unexpected – no.

More precisely, two studies were conducted, in which about 7.6 thousand people took part throughout the United States. In both studies, participants were divided into three groups. The first group watched randomly selected “politically persuasive” campaign videos or popular political videos on covid-19 on YouTube. The second group did not watch the video, but read their text printouts. The third group was the control.

Next, participants in each group completed questionnaires that assessed the credibility of the message they viewed or read. In particular, they had to answer whether they believed that the person in the video / text actually said such and such. The participants then rated how they disagreed with the key point of view conveyed in the message.

The researchers wanted to find an answer to a twofold question: does seeing really mean believing, and if so, how much can a video or text influence someone’s opinion?

As it turned out, people are really more inclined to believe what they saw with their own eyes, rather than read. That is, yes, to see is to believe. However, when it came to the credibility of the broadcast message, there was practically no difference between video and text.

“Just because a video is more believable doesn’t mean it’s capable of changing a person’s point of view,” summed up one of the study’s authors, Adam Berinsky.

Of course, like all scientific research, this work of MIT specialists has a number of reservations. First, although 7,600 participants is a large number, they still may not capture all the points of view of American voters. Second, as the researchers themselves note, the small compelling advantage of video over text may be even smaller outside the research environment.

“While watching the news feed, you may be more interested in video than text. You might be more likely to watch it. But that doesn’t mean video is more compelling than text. It’s just that it is likely to reach a wider audience, “- said one of the study’s authors, David Rand (David Rand).

In other words (at least, the authors of the study came to this conclusion), a deepfake video with the participation of a politician is unlikely to be able to more effectively influence a person’s opinion than fake news about him. The only advantage video has over text is that people are more likely to believe what they see than they read. In addition, the video can reach a wider audience.

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Hacker Hacked Fast Company’s Apple News Account and Spread Racist Messages

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Hacker Hacked Fast Companys Apple News Account and Spread Racist

An unknown hacker was able to access the business publication Fast Company’s Apple News account and sent out a series of obscene and racist messages via push notifications. Subscribers are the victims.

Hacker Hacked Fast Company's Apple News Account and Spread Racist Messages

Fast Company confirmed the hack, and so did Apple. The incident is currently under investigation.

Fast Company’s Apple News account was hacked Tuesday night. After that, two push notifications with obscene and racist content were sent with a minute interval. The messages are disgusting and do not match Fast Company content. We are investigating the incident and have also paused feed updates and closed FastCompany.com until we are confident the situation has been resolved.“, – noted in the publication.

Shortly before the shutdown, the hacker himself posted an entire article on the Fast Company website, where he described in detail how he managed to bypass the protection. It turned out that the accounts on the site were protected by the same password, this also applies to the account of the site administrator. Having gained access to them, the hacker was able to get to the authentication tokens and log in to Apple News.

At the same time, in addition to hooliganism, no financial losses or manipulations were recorded.

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Young hacker who leaked GTA 6 material denies his guilt

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Young hacker who leaked GTA 6 material denies his guilt

The 17-year-old hacker, who was previously arrested in the UK on suspicion of hacking Rockstar Games and Uber, has pleaded not guilty. According to police, he appeared in court over the weekend, but refused to plead guilty to PC misuse. At the same time, he admitted that he violated the conditions of release on bail. Now he is being held in a juvenile detention center.

Young hacker who leaked GTA 6 material denies his guilt

According to investigators, the 17-year-old is part of the Lapsus$ hacker group and is behind the recent leak of videos and other details of the $2 billion GTA 6 game.

Earlier, a hacker under the nickname teapotuberhacker published an archive with video and source code from an early version of GTA 6, which has already gone viral. Take-Two tried to stop the spread of the leak, but it was only partially successful.

The hacker also said that it was he who attacked the Uber computer system, gaining access to correspondence, email addresses, and so on.

At the moment, the investigation is ongoing, so it is not yet clear how this story will end.

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Cloudflare introduces world’s first eSIM with better security than VPN

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Cloudflare introduces worlds first eSIM with better security than VPN

Cloudflare has introduced a new solution that may be suitable for smartphone and mobile Internet users. We are talking about an eSIM card called Zero Trust SIM. Its peculiarity is that it provides an increased level of security, reducing the risk of number substitution.

Cloudflare introduces world's first eSIM with better security than VPN

In technical terms, we are talking about the transfer of DNS requests through the Cloudflare gateway, which allows you to protect them from interception and spoofing. Also promised is a check of all intermediate nodes through which the device accesses the Internet.

According to Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming, Zero Trust SIM technology can outperform VPNs and other security systems as it provides cell-level protection.

Zero Trust SIM will launch first in the US, where only a virtual card for iOS and Android will be available at first. When activated, it will bind to a specific device and allow you to protect it. Physical maps are also expected in the future.

The company is also launching Zero Trust for Mobile Operators, an affiliate program for telecom operators that will enable them to offer subscriptions to the services and tools of the Zero Trust platform. In addition, a similar project is expected for the Internet of Things.

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