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Android 12 introduces new AI-powered feature to improve data security

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Private Compute Core will keep user data separate from all applications and services.

Google experts intend to implement machine learning and artificial intelligence models in Android devices in order to protect user data. With the release of Android 12, experts have unveiled Private Compute Core. Private Compute Core currently supports three features: Live Caption, Smart Reply, and Now Playing.

Prior to Android 12, the platform already used AI to provide the above functions. However, only in Android 12 this feature was allocated a special place in the settings.

According to TechRepublic, one of the most important functions of Private Compute Core is keeping user data separate from all applications and services, making this data available to the operating system when needed. For example, when a user is watching a video with “live subtitles,” the service that listens to the audio and translates it into readable subtitles in real time cannot share the audio with anyone or any other application. With the Private Compute Core, this data is processed in its own sandbox, far from everything else, and then the signatures are presented for viewing.

Private Compute Core will allow Google to develop and release new features while maintaining security, privacy and data locality.

Private Compute Core, despite its name, does not use a dedicated processor. Instead, a dedicated Private Compute Core section resides entirely in software. The reason for this design is that Private Compute Core can be deployed on a wide variety of Android hardware.

Google has also added the ability to clear all received data. If the user suspects that a bit of data has been compromised or used for purposes outside the established norms for the platform, he can go to Settings / Privacy / Private Compute Core and click Clear Data. A pop-up window will appear with the option to select the time interval in which you want to clear the data.

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Top cybersecurity M&A deals in 2021

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The cybersecurity market in 2021 is incredibly hot. Information security service providers buy competitors to gain a foothold, or acquire companies to expand their offerings.

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Women and minorities are more likely to be cyberattacks than other people

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Women are more likely than men to receive messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links.

Demographics play a large role in how often people are victims of cybercrime. Low-income and vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by cybercrime. As the results showed poll 5 thousand people in Germany, the UK and the US, conducted by experts from Malwarebytes, Digitunity and Cybercrime Support Network, minorities, as well as groups of people with low income and low educational level, are more likely to be victims of a cyber attack. Some groups are much more likely to face online threats.

For example, women are much more likely to receive text messages from unknown numbers containing potentially malicious links than men (79% versus 73%). Almost half (46%) of women said their social media accounts had been hacked, compared with 37% of men.

Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) social media accounts are more likely to be attacked than whites (45% versus 40%); BIPOC populations are also more likely to experience identity theft (21% versus 15%). In fact, only 47% of BIPOC respondents escaped the financial consequences of cybercriminals.

Age is also an important factor. 36% of people aged 65 and over have been victims of credit card information theft.

21% of women and 23% of BIPOC respondents experienced “significant” stress when faced with suspicious online activity.

According to the report, the statistics are linked to the overall sense of security (or lack thereof) in cyberspace. While half of all respondents do not feel secure online and 31% do not feel safe online, the numbers are different for women. Women feel the least private online (53% versus 47% of men) and the least secure (35% versus 27% of men).

Socioeconomic class also matters. People with higher incomes (51%) feel more secure online than people with lower incomes (40%). The same is true for educational attainment – users with the highest educational attainment feel more secure (48%) than those who graduated only from college (44%) or high school (40%).

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The United States launched a program to replace network equipment Huawei and ZTE

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The US government allocated $ 1.9 billion for the implementation of the program.

On Monday, September 28, the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced the launch of a program to replace network equipment of telecom operators in rural areas. The government allocated $ 1.9 billion to implement the program, writes Reuters.

The program was approved in July 2021, and applications for participation in it will open on October 29 and will last until January 14, 2022. Its goal is to remove from the networks of American telecom operators equipment manufactured by Chinese companies recognized in the United States as a threat to national security, in particular Huawei and ZTE.

Last year, the FCC recognized Huawei and ZTE as a threat to national security, thereby depriving US companies of the ability to use the $ 8.3 billion government fund to buy equipment from them. In December, the FCC passed regulations requiring carriers using ZTE and Huawei equipment to “dispose of and replace” it.

The requirement is a big problem for telecom operators in rural areas, which do not have the financial ability to purchase new equipment and find specialists who are able to carry out such a replacement.

The latest FCC ruling expands the program from telecom operators with 2 million or less subscribers to operators with 10 million or less subscribers.

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